autism · cancer · Down syndrome · parenting · special needs parenting

Always Waiting For the Other Shoe To Drop

We are on a bit of a roll over here.

We have a steady respite person. This week I got an application for a self-determination employee, someone who will take Ben out and work on community living skills with him, and Ben’s caseworker has things lined up for ABA therapy to start soon.

Not only that, but his health seems to be fairly stable. we have the steady stream of appointments lined up to maintain stasis, but his sinuses are relatively clear this year, and after several months of a MRSA infection, that is clear too. We’re barreling toward 3 years since his last hospitalization, a personal best.

His new psychiatrist is using a combination of medications and supplements which seems to be effective, meaning no violent outbursts in the last two weeks (a big deal here). By every measure, we are making progress, loose ends that I have pursued for years are coming together. We are moving past many of the dead ends and setbacks we have slammed into through again and again.

Only an itty bitty piece of me indulges in celebration. A morsel that is quarantined away, so as not to grow or infect any other part of me. Carefully encapsulated, observed and disciplined, so as not to risk any loss of control. I’m reluctant to even mention any measure of success.

Instead, I steep myself in caution. I mentally list all the things that might go awry, cataloging them repeatedly in chronological, alphabetical, and decreasing and increasing orders of severity. With an epilogue full of asterisks in case of some unforeseen and unforeseeable event.

Because we live in the land of the unforeseeable.

In complex parenting, a hospital discharge can mean a return with a worse diagnosis later.

In complex parenting, medications come with reactions and side effects that strike at any moment.

In complex parenting, a routine appointment too often turns dreadful.

In complex parenting, we brace for the worst-case scenario, not out of fear, but out of habit.

In complex parenting, we don’t rest on success or achievement, because there’s always more to accomplish. Because the bottom can fall out at any time.

We live precariously balanced. We unravel knots while tying up others. We tiptoe around, not on eggshells but on shards of blown glass, knowing that any misstep leads not only to breakage but to harm. We guard our hearts against joy and celebration, no matter how hard-earned, because we’re braced for a crash.

It’s a superstitious, ritualistic juju dance of not jinxing ourselves and warding off the bad by keeping our fingers crossed and a loose grip on the good.

Brené Brown called it Foreboding Joy, and I reaffirm my departure from her on this. If you get excited when I share my news, I won’t join you. When you tell me you’re praying for it, I won’t bother telling you I don’t exactly trust God to keep us from the fire, rescue us from the fire, or keep the fire from consuming us anymore because experience hasn’t borne that out.

I’m keeping my armor fastened, with a crest of foreboding joy on my breast, and charging forward as always. I don’t know if it’s smart, necessary, or maybe even slowing me down, but without it, I stand naked and terrified.

 

adoption · Down syndrome · special needs parenting

The Next Step in Pro-Life

This weekend marks the 45th anniversary of the landmark Roe v. Wade decision which legalized abortion nationally. I am not even going to attempt to discuss the law, rather, I’d like to examine the next step.

What happens after birth?

What happens when children are born with disabilities, and in an instant a parent becomes a caregiver?

What happens when a parent gets addicted to opioids or dies of an overdose?

What happens when parents hurt their children because of human frailty, or neglect, or substance abuse?

What happens when children have enormous medical challenges?

What about services and support for people living with mental illness?

And so much more.

Wouldn’t robust support of families caring for children with exceptional needs be pro-life? Would women be less likely to terminate a pregnancy with a child who has a prenatal diagnosis of disability if they knew that access to everything their child would need to thrive would be available and affordable?

Wouldn’t it be pro-life to fund research and resolution for opioid addition? And while we’re at it, there are record numbers of children in foster care at present, in large part related to opioid addition, being a foster parent is, in my humble opinion, the most stunningly beautiful example of pro-life imaginable.

Do you get what I’m saying here?

There are dozens of ways to embody a full-circle, lifelong pro-life stance without even bringing abortion into the conversation.

But it’s hard.

It’s easy to talk about changing a single law, and to carefully hand select politicians who have a certain box checked on their platform. But if that’s your stance, can you answer what should happen after the children are born?

Adoption.

But wait, is it right to separate a child from their ancestry for life? Biology is enormously important, and while infant adoption is sometimes necessary, far too often it’s a lifelong solution to a short term problem when better solutions for both the child and parents are available.

I don’t claim to have answers, in fact, it’s the questions that overwhelm me.

But as a person who has spent my adult life focused on the children who are already born, the ones with disabilities, the ones whose parents are addicted, the ones who have been orphaned, the ones with mental illness, the ones with so little support. I have come to believe that if everyone who made sure that they voted for the pro-life candidate took a step or two to care for the children once they’re born that it would transform everything. We have the ability and the obligation to fill in those vast gaps for the children who are already born.

advocacy · parenting · special needs parenting

Why Do I Post So Many Pictures of My Kids?

Many bloggers take great care to avoid showing their children's faces, to keep a modicum of privacy for their families. They make up blog names for their kids and keep the family's identity anonymous. I get that, the Internet is far from safe, people steal photos of children and use them for rotten purposes. It seems that it's foolish to churn out photo after photo of my precious brood.

But I do.

It's because I want you to see them, to really see my kids.

I want you to get used to their features; those almond shaped eyes and small mid face that are the hallmarks of Down syndrome.

I want you to see their humanity, their preciousness, and to recognize them as the multifaceted, complex people that they are.

Alex was stared at yesterday. Blatantly, unavoidably stared at for several minutes yesterday. I'm sure it's because he wears his diagnosis on his sweet face. Anyone who might not be familiar or comfortable with Down syndrome will see his differences and not be able to stop examining him in order to perhaps put a finger on just what is different about him.

I want a world where every single person can look at someone with a disability and see the human being, not the difference.

By my sharing of photographs and our daily ups and downs, I hope to give insight that will facilitate that. I want people to understand that my children are as adorable and adored as any other child, and also to realize that there are differences and challenges; both for them and for us as parents and caregivers.

This is all my bodacious effort to make the world a place where they are accepted.

How can I do that if you never see their faces?

I know that some will disagree, and I'm okay with that. In fact I'll gladly listen to any dissenting voice. I've never claimed to have all the answers. I'm just doing everything in my power to make the world a safe, accepting, and welcoming place for my children.

Something many parents get to take for granted.

parenting · special needs parenting

My Life Feels Like a Test I Didn’t Study For

A friend posted those words yesterday and I tried them on to find a perfect fit.

Remember those swimming tests you had to do to get the special armband at summer camp, you know, the one that meant you could swim wherever you want?  Those tests terrified me.

I had what could (perhaps slightly dramatically) be called a near drowning as a toddler. It’s one of my earliest memories, being under the water at my aunt and uncle’s in-ground pool on the nation’s bicentennial. I didn’t lose consciousness or anything, and my dad scooped me out relatively unscathed, except for a lifelong fear of deep water that kept me from completing swimming lessons when I was too terrified to jump into the deep end of the pool.

Regardless of my lack of swimming instruction coupled with the ability to sink to the bottom of the pool and remain there with zero effort which has left me a remedial swimmer well into adulthood, my fear of missing out demanded that I not be left in the shallow area of the lake at camp. So, by sheer force of determination, I took (and passed) the swimming tests at summer camp every year.  I always started out convinced I would drown, but somehow managed to keep my chin just above the water line for the full time mandated to get my armband of freedom.

And now that’s how I live life every day.

When we got married and started having kids I had no notion that anything other than 2.3 typical children would be our end result.  I didn’t realize how intimately acquainted with terms like “translocation 21:21” or “ganglion cells” or “bone anchored hearing aid” I would become. Or that it would be a sink or swim style test that I had no preparation for on an almost daily basis.

But here we are, and today I am reminding myself that I haven’t drown yet.

The test is different every day. Often I pass like it’s no biggie. There are times, though, when I need a lifeguard to throw me a floatation device, and there are days when I have to grab the dock and climb out of the water because my nose is barely clearing the surface. But most days I pass the test.  Those days when it’s a near miss, they blow my confidence, but generally leave me intact if not unscathed, though I never quite get past the fear of drowning.

Life feels like a test I didn’t study for, but I’m learning that I pass it almost every time, even if it’s by the skin of my teeth, and even on the days I don’t pass, I survive to try another day. And I think I’m learning to be okay with it.

special needs parenting

Letting Go of Hope Was the Best Thing I Ever Did

It happened after leukemia treatment ended.  I had spent over three years during treatment waiting for everything to get better, and then it didn’t.  I gave it time, it still didn’t.  I gave it more time.  You get the picture.

Since bringing Ben home, I had consistently set my sights on the next hill, just knowing that once we got past that next hill the downhill roll would begin, and his quality of life would dramatically improve.

And so would the rest of ours.

It happened over and over and over.  Sometimes things would get better, but it never lasts.  And you know what they say about hope deferred.  I lived for years with the heart sickness of deferred hope.

Until I let it go.

Don’t get me wrong.  We’re still diligently pursuing every avenue possible to give Ben the fullest, best life possible.  I’m just realistic that he has a complex, convoluted situation, and that we need to live our best lives in the present rather than chasing an elusive dream of an idyllic, or even normalish, future.

In so doing, I have avoided the devastating crash of the next wave coming, because instead of stubbornly believing that it isn’t coming, I’m dutifully preparing and watching for it.  Instead of constantly setting my sights to an unlikely future, I’m living today and working to make it the best today possible.

By being realistic that each day and the foreseeable future will be just as challenging for him, I can manage our resources to make sure each day is the best we can make it with the challenges instead of wishful thinking of coming days without challenges.

Letting go of that wishful thinking nearly crushed me.  I so want for my boy to be happy and healthy in every possible way, and admitting that the next breakthrough wouldn’t necessarily make that happen was a paradigm shift of epic proportions.  It left me learning a whole new way of coping with life with the complexities of my child’s needs, but I did learn.  I learned to be more steady and cautious with my energy and optimism, and to live fully, focusing on each day and giving it my best in the moment.

And though letting go of hope comes with a certain sadness, it also comes with freedom and peace.

advocacy · special needs parenting

5 Myths About Medicaid that I No Longer Believe

Tomorrow morning a social worker is coming to our house so we can formulate Ben’s plan of care for the Children’s Waiver Program.  This is a day I have waited, hoped, and fought for for years.

I’m going through the motions, cleaning the toilet, vacuuming the floor, and closing the shower curtain because the social worker had no business in my shower anyway.  All the while I’m fully anticipating a disastrous event just as she pulls into the driveway that will leave me mortified, and last, but not least, I’m noticing a fishy smell in the house that I can’t track down for the life of me.

I finished the pre-approved paperwork to enroll Ben in Medicaid this evening, and in so doing, I’m busting some of my own myths about Medicaid.

  1. I always believed that help for people in need or with disabilities was best rendered privately, by charities and churches.  But this report shows how absurd that notion is.
  2. I always believed that Medicaid was for able bodied people who chose not to work, but it actually grants coverage to many elderly people, children, and people with disabilities.
  3. I always believed that Medicaid was just medical insurance.  However, Medicaid covers many programs and supports for disabled people that medical insurance doesn’t.
  4. I always believed that Medicaid was wasteful and exorbitant, but Medicaid is actually pretty thrifty for a government program.
  5. I always thought I would be ashamed to receive government assistance for my family.  I’m actually relieved.  By getting these supports, Ben will be able to remain in our home, something we have doubted many times because his care is so complex.  Seeing as how in the recent past, most people with disabilities lived in institutions from a very young age, I see keeping people with disabilities in the home and the community as a wise investment that is worthy of taxpayer support, and they have the right, granted by SCOTUS, to do so. 

I don’t know the details about the BCRA (nobody does), but I do know that cuts to Medicaid would weaken the supports that keep people with disabilities in the our country safe and healthy in their homes.  I consider this a worthy and valuable use of public funds.  I recognize that the ACA has many issues and needs reworking, but we must protect Medicaid, and the people who need it.

Now I’m off track down and eliminate that fishy smell.

advocacy · special needs parenting

Is Modern Medicine a Luxury?

Welp, here it goes. I can’t be silent. I reviewed the Senate Healthcare Bill, and it affects my son.  I don’t know if my blogging does a darn thing, but I believe I’m obligated to advocate for my child. As such, doing what I can to ensure that people are aware of the ramifications of this bill and asking those who care to make their voices heard, is the least I can do. 

For the sake of brevity, I will keep this to the two factors which have the greatest impact on my child.  The photos below were taken from an NPR summary of the bill. 


Many people think that Medicaid is a hand out to able bodied people who choose not to work.  However, around 90% of Medicaid dollars go to the elderly, disabled or working people whose income falls below the threshold in their state. Therefore, reduced funding to the program hits heaviest on the most vulnerable populations. As adults, both of my sons will rely on Medicaid for their medical coverage.  It’s not exactly clear what these cuts will mean to them, and perhaps that’s the most worrisome part of this. Alex might be just fine if he stays healthy, but Benjamin’s health needs are lifelong. If he cannot stay on our healthcare plan, and Medicaid is cut, what would the options be?  Nothing here is clear, and for families like ours it’s terrifying. 


This part is even more harrowing. In addition to his developmental and medical needs, Ben has serious mental health needs.   He sees a psychiatrist, uses psychiatric medicine, and needs autism therapy, which is a mental health benefit. Without these in place, his wellbeing is in jeopardy. I cannot overstate the seriousness of this situation. As it is, resources for people with developmental, medical and psychiatric needs are sparse, if funding is cut, it would be nothing short of devastating for Ben and our family. 

But we aren’t the only ones. In fact, we’re pretty fortunate so far. Mike works for the state and has his choice of excellent healthcare plans, of which we have chosen the most thorough and economical coverage. Many are self employed without access to such benefits. For us, the cost of healthcare thus far has been a strain, but one that we can manage. For many, it’s already past management and only set to get worse, highlighted in this Washington Post article. 

Look at smiling 12-year-old Parker from Utah, who needs a feeding tube, an aspirator, a trach and loads of medication to survive. One drug costs $100,000 a year. For a while, his family relied on food that neighbors left on their doorstep because Parker’s medical bills were so high after their health insurance capped out.

I’ve followed Parker’s story for years now, and his family deserves better.  They’re working hard, being resourceful, and just want their son to live! 

Here’s the thing, we have spectacular medical science that’s evolving and growing daily. We are able to save lives that just a few years or decades ago were hopeless. It’s marvelous, simply marvelous. But it’s expensive, as would be expected, too expensive for any but the wealthiest citizens to afford. Do we reserve such marvels for those who can afford to buy it? Is modern medicine a luxury for the few?  Is it a commodity available to only those who have the cash reserves to pay for it?  

How do we decide who gets this care?  Do we deny children whose parents don’t have jobs with a hearty benefit package?  Or do we put caps on it and say we can only spend so many dollars to save a person’s life, and after that just shrug it off?  Or do we leave people with mental illness without access?  This is dangerously close to eugenics. I shudder to think that denying Medicaid coverage for mental illness is a tidy way of saying society shouldn’t be obligated to help them. 

Finally, I want to point out that it’s the “pro-life” party that is endorsing all of this, and I’m calling bullshit.  There is nothing life affirming or life-protecting about any of this.  This is prioritizing finances over people and it’s repugnant. If you suggest that charities or churches should fill in the gaps, please just get off that ridiculous notion. In eleven years of managing complex medical, developmental and psychiatric needs, we have tapped into private resources to a great extent, I’m quite savvy at finding and accessing them, and we have had a church with a congregational care employee who identifies and designates church resources for families in crisis. Between the two, the help has been incredibly helpful for certain things, but only a drop in the bucket compared to the day to day impact of copays, deductibles, time and miles. It’s simply not feasible for private organizations to offset such monumental costs. 

So I ask you, do you really think it’s okay for people to suffer and die when medical care is available, but not affordable?