autism · Down syndrome · special needs parenting

How Summer Changes When You Have Kids With High Needs

Summer break isn’t my favorite.

I used to love it. We had a camper and several times each summer our family would visit different parks around the state, enjoying nature and time together. It was idyllic, and this, or something similar is what summer means to many families.

If I had to choose just one word for what has changed, that word would be vigilance.

Our son, Ben, has high needs. Yes, he has Down syndrome, but so does Alex, there’s a difference. Add in autism, with some hefty medical and psychiatric diagnoses, and time with him requires constant vigilance. Like bringing super busy and fearless two-year-old twins to the Grand Canyon overlook without a rail kind of vigilance. And that is just outside at our home, when we go anywhere else our efforts are multiplied.

This is why:

  1. Our child doesn’t have discernment. He occupies a twelve-year-old body, but his mind is much like that of a toddler. Dangers like busy roads, campfires and water mean nothing to him, and we have no way to explain it to him.
  2. He doesn’t learn from experience. Family members have been flummoxed to see him run into the water until it’s over his head, then stand there until someone rescues him. After coming out coughing and hacking, he will turn around and do it again. And again. And again. He will even laugh while doing it because he gets attention for it. He has yet to grow out of it, and I have my doubts that he will. Any time spent near anything dangerous is similar.
  3. He doesn’t respond to punishment of any sort. Neither in school nor at home. We have yet to find a way to create a consequence for his actions which discourages him from doing the same in the future, and that is with social workers and psychologists using their best tools. (No, this isn’t an invitation for you to share your idea with us).
  4. He melts down. Too much stimulation, too many “no’s” or transitions, or just any change of setting are triggers for meltdowns. Anyone with a toddler knows what it looks like, flopping on the floor, screaming, kicking, hitting, biting and more, with murderous rage. But this is a twelve-year-old. He weighs about 100 pounds now, and he isn’t getting any smaller.
  5. He has discovered that taking his clothes off gets a reaction, and he loves reactions. Any time spent in public is taking the risk of public nudity.
  6. It’s a break from the structure and routine that keeps him together. School is a setting with professionals who work with him on these and many other things. He craves the predictability, and reproducing it at home doesn’t and won’t work, and goes against the fluidity that makes summer fun for the other kids.

We aren’t alone either. You may not see them, chances are they are holed up at home being selective about going out, but there are many families like ours, struggling just to visit the lake for an hour, or stop at the ice cream store for a cone on a hot evening. We know we need to get our kids into the community, but we do it judiciously, because so often it ends in frustrated exhaustion and tears. We live this year-round, but during the school year, our children have the structure and stability of professionals during the day, and we meet them refreshed and ready in the evening. Those with school during the summer have less of it, and the free time feels chaotic to them, and their families both.

Why do I bother with telling you this?

Because not very many people will. We left church, one with a special needs ministry because our son’s behavior and medical needs were too much for the volunteers. We no longer attend the special needs family camp we tried, because his needs were too much for the volunteers. We are the outsiders, the resources there are don’t fit for us, and we struggle alone. And I think it needs to be said.

 

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “How Summer Changes When You Have Kids With High Needs

  1. Thank you for your brave and bold statement here. We have a similar situation and the words that tend to bubble to the surface when I think of summer break are dread, grief, endurance, guilt…certainly not joy, or vacation, or any other light and happy feeling. We are on the brink of losing school as a respite (and by on the brink, I mean we have three more years) and we are bracing ourselves for what that will look like when day programs are not required to keep our son, even when his behavior escalates into aggression.

    Like

  2. Thank you for taking the time to write these important pieces. I work for eParent.com and I would love to talk about the opportunity to share your stories with our readers. Please email me if you are interested. Thank you again.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s